How to Install Roofing Nails and Screws

how to install roofing

How to Install Roofing Nails and Screws

Asphalt shingles are the most traditional form of roofing materials, which is why many homeowners prefer them. However, shingles usually crack and break apart after a few years. For this reason, more homeowners are considering asphalt replacement as their roofing material of choice. Here are some tips to help you learn how to install roofing felt and asphalt shingles the right way.

One of the most important things you need to know when learning how to install roofing felt or asphalt shingles is that you have to treat them properly if you want them to last for a long time. If you fail to follow the proper installation procedures, you risk having the roof leak or caving in as the layers become brittle and weak. If you see signs of wear and tear, then you should stop using the material immediately and replace it with new ones. Otherwise, you will only be replacing useless material and wasting your money.

One of the most important things you need to know when learning how to install roofing felt or asphalt shingles is the difference between nails and staples. Although the two materials to look similar, they are very different. Staple roofing material uses long, slender nails driven through concrete while the nail is shorter and stubby driven through the shingles. Depending on the local codes, you may also need to use metal clips or cleats to hold the nails in place.

One important aspect to know about roofing felt and asphalt shingles is the difference between underlayment and roofing tar or roof tar. The two may appear to be the same at first glance, but they are different under the right conditions. Over time, you may notice that certain brands of underlayment are slightly slippery while others are not. To avoid this problem, make sure you buy roofing felt that has been specifically manufactured for wet and wintry conditions.

Before you put on your roofing nails or screws, check to see if you have the proper amount of underlayment. Most manufacturers recommend an underlayment that is about one third as thick as the roof deck, which comes up to a thickness of about 15%. This thickness allows for a sound barrier to be built without creating any creaking sounds or moisture problems that can be disruptive to the finished look of your home. If you’re uncertain how thick your deck should be, go to a store that sells building supplies and ask the salesman for advice.

Most importantly, consult a professional in the field. The best way to learn how to install shingles and felt is to talk to a roofer who has experience installing all different types of roofs. Talk to friends who have had experience with the different materials to get a better idea of what you should expect. When you have a chalk line showing where the felt will go on your roof, use it as a guide when you’re measuring your deck.